Project Medishare | Pediatric neurosurgeries successful; patients begin to return home
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Pediatric neurosurgeries successful; patients begin to return home

  |   Celebrities, Cholera Response, Pediatric Neurosurgery

This past weekend, nine-month old Bidina Joseph received endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) to treat her hydrocephalus. Today Magdala will take Bidina back to their home in Ti Goave, a two-hour drive from Port-au-Prince. Magdala said she is so thankful for the pediatric neurosurgery team who helped her daughter. Over a three-day period a pediatric neurosurgery team from Washington University School of Medicine performed 22 surgeries. Photo by Jennifer Browning.

By Jennifer Browning

Magdala Ezeve started noticing Bidina’s head was growing abnormally larger when her baby was three months old.

She brought Bidina to Bernard Mevs in February. At that time, Project Medishare’s nurse liaison Maguy Rochelin was working at the field hospital assisting medical staff with earthquake victims. After a call from a Bernard Mevs nurse stopped by the hospital on her way home, met with Magdala, retrieved all of her information and told her she would contact her when pediatric neurosurgeons arrived to do another assessment for children with hydrocephalus.

Earlier this month, Dr. Keith Rich from Washington University School of Medicine assessed Bidina and determined she was a candidate for surgery. This past weekend in spite of the cholera outbreak, Dr. Rich and his team of pediatric neurosurgeons performed an endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) on Bidina.

Today Magdala will take Bidina back to their home in Ti Goave, a two-hour drive from Port-au-Prince. Magdala said she is so thankful for Dr. Rich being able to help her daughter.

“I am so very happy because before the surgery she had a crooked eye that was going to the left,” Magdala said. “I was so worried about this, but today it is already looking normal. My daughter is happy, she is playing with me and laughing.”

Over a three-day period the pediatric neurosurgery team performed 22 surgeries. Eleven of those children have already been cleared to return home, and five more, including Bidina, will be discharged from the hospital today.

For follow-up appointments parents will be able to take their children to Healing Hands, one of Project Medishare’s partners, or return to Hospital Bernard Mevs Project Medishare. For those who do their follow-up through Healing Hands, Natacha Guillaume, a clinical manager with Healing Hands, will send a report to Maguy so Project Medishare can continue to have an accurate case file of the patient.