Project Medishare | Hospital begins to receive transfer patients as other medical camps close their doors
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Hospital begins to receive transfer patients as other medical camps close their doors

  |   Earthquake Response

Francois and her mother watch as Lori Carpenter creates a posterior splint. The splint is helpful because, unlike a cast, it allows doctors to routinely check the open wound on the 10-year-old's foot. Photo by Jennifer Browning.

By Jennifer Browning

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti–As the dust still settles around Port-au-Prince from the 7.0 earthquake that rumbled the city more than two weeks ago, JoAnne Pierre brings her 10-year-old daughter, Francois, to the Project Medishare/UM Global Institute hospital for an injury to her foot and lower leg.

Francois lives in Cité Soliel with her mother and father. When the earthquake hit, a boulder fell on her foot.

The young girl had been treated at another medical camp, but that camp is no longer there. This is what the Project Medishare/UM Global Institute team is seeing more of…..transferred patients from other medical camps who have closed their doors and gone home.

With little information, doctors checked her swollen foot, which revealed an open wound. After cleaning the wound, and dressing it with bandages. Francois’ mother told the doctors that her child could not put pressure on her foot, so the doctors working triage, sent the child to get an x-ray in hopes of ruling out a fracture or a break.

With the x-ray revealing a slight break at the top of Francois’ foot, she was then taken to orthopedic technician, Lori Carpenter. Carpenter who is volunteering from Lima, Ohio, helped stabilize the child’s leg with a posterior splint which allows doctors to routinely check the open wound on her leg.

A week ago, doctors would not have been able to perform an x-ray of Francois’s foot, but thanks to Carestream Health and AutoGov, who donated the machine, such technology is possible in this makeshift hospital at the Port-au-Prince airport.

Because medical volunteer teams in the area are beginning to shut down and go home, Project Medishare/UM Global Institute will continue to see transfer patients arrive at the hospital.  Along with the patients already being treated at the tented facility, many of these transfer patients will continue to need long-term care. Project Medishare/UM Global Institute will be here when everyone else has gone home and will need funding to support our relief efforts here in Port-au-Prince.

Click here to donate to Project Medishare/UM Global Institute to help us continue doing the good work on the ground.

Project Medishare/UM Global Institute now offers a way for donors to give monthly. Click here to set up your monthly giving to help medical relief efforts.